SOFT LANDING? NOT SO SURE, SAYS IMF; FEMALE BOARD MEMBERS – WHERE ARE THEY?

SOFT LANDING? NOT SO SURE, SAYS IMF; FEMALE BOARD MEMBERS – WHERE ARE THEY?

SOFT LANDING? NOT SO SURE, SAYS IMF

The International Monetary Fund has downgraded its growth forecasts for Australia, which is not good news.

In its latest World Economic Outlook report, the IMF forecast that Australia would only grow 1.6 per cent in 2023, a decrease of 0.3 per cent from its previous forecast made in January.

The Fund also reported that Australian households are among the most indebted in the developed world.

Combined with stubbornly high inflation, the IMF believes that signs the Australian economy could achieve a “soft landing” have faded.

Not that the Treasurer was having any of it. Jim Chalmers spent much of the week saying it is still possible for Australia to avoid a recession, stating that he remains “optimistic about the future”.

The cloudy economic outlook is set to be a big talking point for Treasurer Chalmers at the G20 Finance Ministers’ Meeting this week and guide next month’s budget.

FEMALE BOARD MEMBERS – WHERE ARE THEY?

Australia’s big corporates are facing fresh calls to develop female talent to overturn the dearth of women on company boards.

A survey by the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD), found that the proportion of female board directors is 36 per cent across Australia’s top 200 companies. According to the Institute, the disparity arises because chief executives sit on company boards, and only 11 per cent of ASX 200 companies have female CEOs.

AICD chief executive Mark Rigotti said boards need to ensure there is a greater pipeline of female talent being developed and robust succession and leadership programs so that more women can compete for executive-level positions.

SO… WHAT DO YOU DO?

When making introductions or small talk, how often do you hear the question: “So, what do you do?”.

Well, it’s time to stop, according to Rachel Feintzieg, a columnist at The Wall Street Journal. She argues we should stop telling everyone what we do for a living as jobs rarely last forever, and we risk conversations becoming a status competition when the topic of work is brought up.

Feintzieg interviewed numerous individuals who have freed themselves of their job descriptions, and they recommend that we should lead conversations with our hobbies and family, asking “What fills your time?” and “What brings you joy?” instead.

ONE LAST THING…

Source: Air Mail


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