SOME GOOD NEWS, SOME NOT SO GOOD; BUT IT’S ALWAYS GOOD NEWS FOR SOME CEOs

SOME GOOD NEWS, SOME NOT SO GOOD; BUT IT’S ALWAYS GOOD NEWS FOR SOME CEOs

SOME GOOD NEWS, SOME NOT SO GOOD

First, the good news: Australia’s unemployment rate dropped during May to 3.6 per cent, representing the strongest jobs growth in almost 12 months.

And yet … some Australian businesses have reported significant declines in sales as consumer confidence remains at levels not seen since the 1990s recession.

David Jones stores experienced double-digit falls in sales as consumers tightened their purse strings, according to “leaked” figures.

Meanwhile, Domino’s Pizza saw $241 million wiped from its market value on Tuesday after it announced stagnant underlying earnings and the closure of more than 90 stores as it struggles to pass on higher ingredients, energy, and transport costs to consumers.

BUT IT’S ALWAYS GOOD NEWS FOR SOME CEOs

While most employees struggle to make ends meet, new figures revealed this week that CEOs have been doing just fine, thank you.

The Governance Institute’s annual remuneration report found that CEOs across 1,167 boards received an average 15 per cent rise in fixed pay last year, with those sitting in the big seat of the country’s top 200 companies winning an even bigger increase of 19 per cent.

With only a few months to AGM season, boards will need a strong narrative around their remuneration policies to stand up to shareholder scrutiny on executive pay.

GENERATIONAL STEREOTYPES – WHO’S THE NEEDIEST?

So, is Gen Z the neediest generation, as Australian Federal Police Commissioner Reece Kershaw told the Senate last month?

Maybe. But according to the ABC, Gen Zs may not be the only generation to suffer typecasting. We all believe that Millennials are entitled, Gen Xers are cynical, and Baby Boomers are narcissistic.

Bobby Duffy, the director of the Policy Institute at King’s College, London, and author of The Generation Myth, told the broadcaster that such stereotypes are based on what he described as “lazy thinking” which makes such assumptions “useless or dangerous”, especially in the workplace.

ONE LAST THING…


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